Mandarin semolina cake

Mandarin semolina cake – http://www.helenscchin.com

I have recreated this recipe from Lisa Ho. Her cake is called Semolina cake with orange syrup.

I was intrigued when I noticed Lisa Ho cake has no eggs. I was inspired to try baking cake without eggs. It’s scary to try baking without eggs. It’s can be easily turned to disaster cake which I did change some ingredients to make my own recipe.

It’s tempting to rationalise that without eggs will my cake rise and be a proper cake with eggs. Out there there are many cakes without eggs. Got to be courage and bake trusting God. Thanks God, my cake turned out well delicious beautiful moist and fluffy.

Let’s bake!!!

Ingredients
170 g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
285 g semolina flour
180 g castor sugar
2 Tsp baking powder
2 teaspoon finely grated orange zest
1 Tsp cinnamon
1/2 Tsp salt
300 ml Thickened cream
300 ml Double cream

Method

Preheat the oven to 160 degrees C. Grease the bundt mould. In a medium size bowl mix semolina, sugar, baking powder, orange zest, cardamom and salt well.

In the mixing bowl, add thickened and double cream and mix well. Next add semolina mixture in to the cream mixture; stir to combine well. The add melted cooled down butter. Beat well.

Gently pour the batter into the bundt. Bake for at least 45 – 55 minutes until golden brown and firm to touch. Leave in switched off oven for 30 minutes. Remove semolina cake to cooled in the pan further for 10 minutes. Invert the cake onto a plate.

Serve with tea or coffee of your choice.

Note: oven temperatures vary. You may need less or more time. I use fan force so my temperatures is 160 degrees C. Lisa Ho use no fan so 170 degrees C.

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3 Comments

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  1. Looks delicious, Helen. Semolina Cake is a very common cake in many parts of the world, including Singapore and Malaysia. It’s called Sugee Cake where we come from.

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    1. Thank you. Yes, back there I never need to cook. Until I retired from world business then I took up cooking as hobby. My niece can bake sugee cake, she never give me the recipe.

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